Author Topic: AntiOedipus Revisited  (Read 1265 times)

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Holden

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Re: AntiOedipus Revisited
« Reply #15 on: August 13, 2019, 01:16:33 pm »
I agree with you there. As Kafka says,sure there is hope, just not for us.I am really afraid of Nietzsche's eternal recurrence. For it would mean I will have to get humiliated again so many times. Yes, I wanted to tell you that I really find it interesting that you have read quite a bit on anarchism. That is the political philosophy I am closest to,but I am afraid the State will never let us alone. It will always be there to torment us.

You are right Plato thinks too highly of man. I just want to you to know that ,well, that I am suffering too. In the office by colleagues torment me and in my house my parents, particularly my mum. Thank satan I did not marry! That would have the end of me.
You might like to check out this book called Leaving Las Vagas.The author was about my age when he, well, when he disappeared for good.

Take care.
La Tristesse Durera Toujours                                  (The Sadness Lasts Forever ...)
-van Gogh.

Silenus

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Re: AntiOedipus Revisited
« Reply #16 on: August 13, 2019, 06:37:14 pm »
I am merely a layman in terms of reading about Anarchism, as I am in other subjects of interest. Yes the political philosophy is interesting, but many of the sub-groups are far too communal for my taste. And when communities form, heirarchy forms. This is what the Anarchists refuse to accept: that heirarchy is unfortunately "encoded" within our biological nature.

The Individualists interest me, and I try not to post political diatribes here and opt for the more "poetic" and frankly pessimistic writings of said Individualists. It seems that a number of them studied Schopenhauer, understood the futility of their efforts and were not afraid to slander the masses. So I stand with them in that.

It is no wonder that my "philosophical beginnings" began with Emerson and Thoreau, which led to Camus and so on and so on. I just don't care for groups; and very rare is it for me to meet a person within whom I can see a total individual. But I am glad to on the off-chance that it happens.

As for Leaving Las Vegas, it is one of my favorite films! I haven't read the book, but I believe it is semi-autobiographical; though I may be wrong. There are many different angles to take from the story, but one that really hits home is how rare and truly wonderful it is to find someone else to totally and unabashedly confide in, and whom accepts you and whatever wreckage you have strewn around your life.

Even though we here are lovers of solitude, it is nice to have such people in our lives, no matter how transient the relationship, and whether here on the forum or the rare birds of in-person life.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2019, 06:40:33 pm by Silenus »

"And the strict master Death bids them dance."

Holden

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Re: AntiOedipus Revisited
« Reply #17 on: August 14, 2019, 09:47:22 am »
In the movie, when Ben's boss tells him that they are firing him,what I liked was that Ben did not resist .He just accepted being fired.In my teenage suicidal phases I always felt like Ben in that I thought that even if something does go wrong it does not matter because I am here for a very short time .

You are right,this message board is indeed like Las Vegas for most of us,certainly for me. In the office today one man shouted a lot at me and on a normal day I would have indulged in a shouting match but I was cool as a cucumber today as I imagined that I am living my last days and so why to get all worked up unnecessarily. What I have noticed is that there is no end to anger and hatred really.No end at all.

Yes the book is semi-autobiographical as the author O'brien was an alcoholic too, a writer too, but he died because of self-inflicted gun shots.He was 33 then.It was his "Jesus Year"  :-\
But in what little experience I possess, women are generally not like Sara because they want a man who has a position in the society,yes, even the prostitute are like that.I have met Bens in my life but never a Sara. But I don't know. Maybe there are women like her ,who knows.

I like Thoreau.I think he was even arrested for the police for some small negligence. Here its really bad. Prisons are just like hell.25-30 men in a cell meant for 2 or 3.

La Tristesse Durera Toujours                                  (The Sadness Lasts Forever ...)
-van Gogh.

Silenus

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Re: AntiOedipus Revisited
« Reply #18 on: August 14, 2019, 06:04:52 pm »
I think those with sensitivities similar to ours eventually just give up playing the game seriously. I've been working well into the evening this week and I choose to sit for the past two and a half hours, as I am now. Someone could walk into the mechanical shop at any time, but that's alright. I mentally fired myself a while ago, and mentally retired from work when I started fresh out of community college (where you're asked to make big goals (lies) for your life). ;)

I hope your taking it easy will bode well for you. Spraking from experience, I find it shocking every time when I see just how seriously people take this game of work to be, when all we're doing is playing dress-up and hoping for nothing out of the ordinary, mundane routine.

Whoever it is that owns your place of work probably has zero clue of the daily goings-on there. All they care about is the bottom line and you and I are just along for the ride. So fuckk them.

I can be a pretty hateful person, Holden. To refer back to the Individualist Anarchists, they say that one must embrace their hatred and to have enemies; it is no less real of an emotion than love or joy. I agree. Unlike the lovey-dovey hippies and New Age followers, I see no peace and no room for rest here.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2019, 06:07:56 pm by Silenus »

"And the strict master Death bids them dance."

Holden

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Re: AntiOedipus Revisited
« Reply #19 on: August 15, 2019, 09:47:33 am »
Yes,no rest for rest. For any one.You are right. The owner-class does not care a damn. The problem is I like neither capitalism nor Marxism :) Heck, I don't particularly like having to draw break every damn second either :-X

I have been working for over ten years now after college and let me tell you it does not get easier. In fact,if anything, it is only becoming more difficult for me to hold onto my job. Over here, its either that or the street. There are so many of us that not even Jesus would be able to create enough bread and fish to feed us all.My parents are glued to the telly watching the country's military's parade. They are just like the hard-core Republican you might find over there.My mum even more than my dad.When I was a child I think I once overheard an story about me,I am not sure if that's true. When my mom was carrying me, my dad wanted to get me aborted as he was having no job/no proper job,but my maternal grandmother insisted that as I was the couple's first baby,they should have me and they can always get any subsequent babies terminated.

So, they brought me along for the ride,thanks a ton ,old lady :(

La Tristesse Durera Toujours                                  (The Sadness Lasts Forever ...)
-van Gogh.

The Creature

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Re: AntiOedipus Revisited
« Reply #20 on: August 26, 2019, 11:53:09 pm »
Quote from: Holden
In Plato's Dialogue called the Laws,one of the character says the impulse to destroy "comes neither from man nor from God,its an infatuate obsession that is bred in men by crime done long age and never expiated and so runs its fatal course."Dear brother in suffering,we carry within us an inherited curse, a moral frailty that we derive from some evil ancestor.

Quote from: Silenus
Plato is right on in that it is an inherited curse; if only he understood that it is all living organisms, all of LIFE (call it the DNA molecule if you wish) that must destroy in order to use energy. Something tells me that he thought too highly of man, as some sort of above-animal. Such is the course of things, from shamanism to Platonism, to Christianity, the Enlightenment, democracy, socialism and onwards to the worship of STUFF (gadgets and toys). Some speak of progress, but all of these value-systems are nothing but the same old tripe wrapped in shiny new gloss, one right after the other.

Unlike the Platonists, I see no redemption from this.

In an old thread called Madness Theory, I mention a book called Insanity as Redemption in Contemporary American Fiction: Inmates Running the Asylum by Barbara Tepa Lupak.

I think I will reread that soon.   The word that brought this text to mind?  Redemption.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2019, 03:12:36 pm by Gorticide »
Things They Will Never Tell YouArthur Schopenhauer has been the most radical and defiant of all troublemakers.

Gorticide @ Nothing that is so, is so DOT edu

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The Creature

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Re: AntiOedipus Revisited
« Reply #21 on: July 23, 2021, 12:01:49 pm »
Deleuze and Guattari famously proclaimed in “Anti-Oedipus“ that the “schizophrenic out for a walk is a better model than a neurotic lying on the analyst’s couch.”

See 5 Ways to Understand Deleuze Through the Work of David Byrne and the Talking Heads

Quote
The best example of Byrne’s schizophrenic style is given in a promotional video, created for the release of the Talking Heads film “Stop Making Sense,” in which he interviews himself in a multitude of guises. It’s possibly the most postmodern pop-culture interview ever recorded. The point here is that rather than being a kind of coping mechanism, Byrne’s multiple personalities are a form of positive action, in which his desire escapes from the confines of a singular identity. Freud says of the schizophrenic that “his remarks often seem nonsensical” ...

Stop making sense!   ;D

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dE-mxVxFXLg
Things They Will Never Tell YouArthur Schopenhauer has been the most radical and defiant of all troublemakers.

Gorticide @ Nothing that is so, is so DOT edu

~ Tabak und Kaffee Süchtigen ~

Holden

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To the Greatest Spiritual Director Ever
« Reply #22 on: July 23, 2021, 12:29:57 pm »
I hope the government increases the social security amount which is given to you soon. I try to work on some maths problems almost everyday. I am not sure if you have ever tried melatonin,but its pretty cheap and with almost no side effects  and so, if and when you feel very depressed you might like to check it out.

I hope that you manage to study a great deal of mathematics.I can imagine that  around 2025 or 2026, I might be in a position to really share some really nice mathematical things with you, if the good Lord's willing and the creek don't rise.

I understand mathematical ideas better now. Only, I wish to understand them in a much better manner still. I think I can do it if I were to live long enough. Like I have told you earlier, my maternal grandfather was truly gifted and was selected to study at the best institute in the country at that point of time,only his father refused to fund his studies despite having enough money with him. That was truly tragic.Schopenhauer says that a child inherits his intelligence from his mother and not father. Maybe that is why I no longer find mathematics intimating, while my father still does.

Also, I have the greatest spiritual director one could possibly hope to have-you.

I really hope that people stop bothering you and let you do your own thing. Some interesting videos for you:

https://youtu.be/k_dBRtaPliM

https://youtu.be/hG9C0VwruXE

Get Well Soon.
La Tristesse Durera Toujours                                  (The Sadness Lasts Forever ...)
-van Gogh.